Current News Today

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

10 facts about Americans and coronavirus vaccines


Nurse Caitlin Crowley pins on a button stating she has been vaccinated for COVID-19 at the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center in Boston on Dec. 24, 2020. (Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images)
Nurse Caitlin Crowley pins on a button stating she has been vaccinated for COVID-19 at the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center in Boston on Dec. 24, 2020. (Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images)

The coronavirus pandemic has claimed more than 670,000 lives in the United States as of Sept. 20, and the spread of the highly transmissible delta variant has added new urgency to the federal government’s efforts to vaccinate all Americans against the virus. As the drive to inoculate more people continues, here are 10 facts about Americans and COVID-19 vaccines, based on an August Pew Research Center survey of more than 10,000 U.S. adults.

Pew Research Center published this analysis to examine how COVID-19 vaccination patterns in the United States differ by demographic, religious and political factors, and to assess broader public attitudes on key questions related to coronavirus vaccines. The findings in this analysis are based primarily on a survey of 10,348 U.S. adults, conducted from Aug. 23 to 29, 2021.

Everyone who took part in the survey is a member of Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way, nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about the ATP’s methodology. Here are the questions asked in the August survey, along with responses, and its methodology.

Demographics of COVID-19 vaccination status within the Republican and Democratic Party

Around three-quarters of U.S. adults (73%) said in August that they had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, with the vast majority in this group saying they were fully vaccinated. The survey findings align closely with administrative data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, which, as of early September, showed that three-quarters of adults had received at least one vaccine dose. Surveys have generally aligned closely with the CDC’s vaccination data.

Democrats are far more likely than Republicans to have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose, though majorities in both groups say they have done so. Among Democrats and independents who lean to the Democratic Party, 86% said they were at least partially vaccinated as of August, compared with six-in-ten Republicans and GOP leaners. Factoring in ideology as well as party affiliation, nine-in-ten self-described liberal Democrats said they had received at least one dose, compared with 83% of conservative or moderate Democrats, 63% of moderate or liberal Republicans and 58% of conservative Republicans.

In both parties, older people and those with higher levels of education are more likely to have received at least one dose. As of August, 86% of Americans ages 65 and older said they were at least partially vaccinated, compared with 73% of those ages 50 to 64, 69% of those 30 to 49 and 66% of those 18 to 29. Older Americans were among the first groups to become eligible for COVID-19 vaccines due to the increased risk of severe illness they face from the virus.

Americans with more formal schooling are also more likely to be vaccinated. Around nine-in-ten of those with a postgraduate degree or more (89%) said they had received at least one dose by August, compared with smaller shares of those with a bachelor’s degree (81%), some college education (69%) or a high school diploma or less (66%).

These patterns appear in both partisan coalitions. Among Republicans, for example, 80% of those ages 65 and older said they had received at least one dose by August – far higher than the share of younger Republicans who had done so.

Unlike earlier in the pandemic,…



Read More:10 facts about Americans and coronavirus vaccines

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Get more stuff like this
in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.